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Somewhere in Huangpu District. Although usually quite chaotic and messy, Chinese streets are full of extraordinary people and unique scenes.

Somewhere in Huangpu District. Although usually quite chaotic and messy, Chinese streets are full of extraordinary people and unique scenes.

Shanghai might leave you with mixed feelings. On the one hand, it is a vibrant and colorful city with hundreds of stunning places to visit. It overwhelms at first, but once you get used to it, exploring it becomes a fascinating experience. On the other hand, Shanghai strives to keep its beautiful ancestry intact, but things there went too far to get back on the right track. It was left on its own with many problems like pollution, crime rate, overpopulation and traffic congestion. It was a fascinating and unforgettable experience to visit Shanghai and feel its vibe for a few days, but I imagine that living there might be tough.

Bicycles near the famous Nanjing Road. I was expecting to see more of them in China, but it seems that cars and motorbikes are slowly replacing traditional means of transport.

Bicycles near the famous Nanjing Road. I was expecting to see more of them in China, but it seems that cars and motorbikes are slowly replacing traditional means of transport.

The view of Pudong as seen from the Bund. That was one of the only days during our trip when famous Chinese smog was not reducing the clarity of the sky.

The view of Pudong as seen from the Bund. That was one of the only days during our trip when famous Chinese smog was not reducing the clarity of the sky.

Chinese family on a scooter. Traffic in Shanghai might look really scary and it is not uncommon to see as much as four people on a single-track vehicle. Shot by Lukas.

Chinese family on a scooter. Traffic in Shanghai might look really scary and it is not uncommon to see as much as four people on a single-track vehicle. Shot by Lukas.

Typhoon Haikui striking Eastern China. The wind was so strong that it had been breaking umbrellas and various other objects with ease.

Typhoon Haikui striking Eastern China. The wind was so strong that it had been breaking umbrellas and various other objects with ease.

Shanghai is a street photographer’s dream come true. As almost everywhere in China, people are very camera-friendly and either don’t care about being photographed (the better option) or reacts with a smile and all those funny gestures that are believed to look great on photos (the worse one). Streets of Pudong and Huangpu District (two areas that gather most of Shanghai’s spots worth visiting) are usually extremely crowded, so wide prime lens is your best friend there. I was using Nikkor 24mm f/1.4G ED, but any focal length between 24mm and 35mm would do. Photographing people and scenes with such a wide lens might be tricky and awkward at first, but being close is what street photography is all about, right?